Rival private governance networks : Competing to define the rules of sustainability performance

SMITH, T M
Call Number
PR 10720
Added Author
FISCHLEIN, M
Publication
Elsevier 2010
URL
Language
eng
Location Item Class Call Number Accession Number Copy Number Barcode Status eResource  
Special Collection - HQ
Photocopies-Reprints
PR 10720
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$a Rival private governance networks : Competing to define the rules of sustainability performance
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$a SMITH, T M
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$a University of Minnesota, NorthStar Initiative for Sustainable Enterprise, Institute on the Environment, 1954 Buford Avenue, Suite 325, St. Paul, MN 55108, United States
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$a In Global Environmental Change 2010 Vol 20 (3) August : 511-522
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$a Private governance of environmental and social performance of organizations, processes and products is gaining prominence in market and policy arenas, and thus, increasingly influencing sustainability outcomes. This study presents a concept of rival private governance where multiple initiatives compete for rule-setting authority. Specifically, we argue that heterogeneous actors organize in network form to establish legitimacy of new sustainability governance fields. In an effort to preempt threats from these new fields of governance, nonparticipating actors create rival private governance networks and compete based on each network's ability to access unique relational assets from participants. Based on the cases of carbon off-set standards, green building rating systems and sustainable forestry certifications, we suggest that this competitive market vetting results in pressures toward the convergence of governance rules over time, but not a single winning set of rules. Our findings illustrate that multiple and competing networks can provide innovative, legitimate and dynamically evolving governance of sustainability, while presenting new challenges for public and private sector actors.
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$a PR10720
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$a PRIVATE GOVERNANCE
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$u https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2010.03.006
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Subject
SUSTAINABILITY
PRIVATE GOVERNANCE
GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANCE
ENVIRONMENTAL FRIEDLY
PHOTOCOPIES--REPRINTS
Summary
Private governance of environmental and social performance of organizations, processes and products is gaining prominence in market and policy arenas, and thus, increasingly influencing sustainability outcomes. This study presents a concept of rival private governance where multiple initiatives compete for rule-setting authority. Specifically, we argue that heterogeneous actors organize in network form to establish legitimacy of new sustainability governance fields. In an effort to preempt threats from these new fields of governance, nonparticipating actors create rival private governance networks and compete based on each network's ability to access unique relational assets from participants. Based on the cases of carbon off-set standards, green building rating systems and sustainable forestry certifications, we suggest that this competitive market vetting results in pressures toward the convergence of governance rules over time, but not a single winning set of rules. Our findings illustrate that multiple and competing networks can provide innovative, legitimate and dynamically evolving governance of sustainability, while presenting new challenges for public and private sector actors.
Corresp. Author
SMITH, T M
University of Minnesota, NorthStar Initiative for Sustainable Enterprise, Institute on the Environment, 1954 Buford Avenue, Suite 325, St. Paul, MN 55108, United States
E-mail
Notes
In Global Environmental Change 2010 Vol 20 (3) August : 511-522